The Da vinci Legacy

If you love art and history, this is an excellent read that you’re sure to enjoy.
Manhattan Book Review

A new illustrated book—The Da Vinci Legacy—tells the untold story of how Leonardo da Vinci, who died exactly 500 years ago in France, became the pop icon he is today. The book has also inspired a new film, The Search for the Mona Lisa, narrated by Morgan Freeman. The film airs on Public Television stations throughout the United States.

This read elegantly separates the work and legacy from the man of mystery, and in doing so provides an enjoyable stroll through some of the highlights of art history… Read this lovely book and rediscover the magnificent talent of the original Renaissance man.

GoodReads, March 1, 2019

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To mark the 500th anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci’s death on May 2, 2019, this new book lifts the veil on an enduring mystery: how did Leonardo, a painter of few works who died in obscurity in France while overshadowed by his rivals Michelangelo and Raphael, become the star icon that he is today? Find out more.

The Search For The Mona Lisa

Leonardo da Vinci’s portrait of the Mona Lisa does not depict the Mona Lisa. That is the conclusion of a new TV special entitled The Search for the Mona Lisa, narrated by Morgan Freeman, based on the book The Da Vinci Legacy. The dramatized documentary stars Alessandro Demcenko as Leonardo.

Using newly discovered evidence, and featuring Italian star Alexandro Demcenko as Leonardo, the film is a thriller-like pursuit for the real identity of the most famous portrait in the world. Produced by Pantheon Studios, producers of the 2018 TV special The Search for the Last Supper, the film also features top Da Vinci experts from Europe and the US. These include Vincent Delieuvin, Curator at the Louvre; Arnold Nesselrath, Curator at the Vatican Museums; Larry Keith, Keeper and Conservator at the National Gallery (London); and Prof John Asmus, UC San Diego.”

Young Leonardo

Provocative and original, this fresh look at Leonardo da Vinci’s formative years in Milan provides a radically different scenario of how he created his signature style that would transform Western art forever. For example, Isbouts and Brown show that much of the Sforza patronage was directed on vast projects to which Leonardo never gained entry. As a result, his exceptional talent remained largely unrecognized right up to the Last Supper.

The Mona Lisa Myth

The Mona Lisa Myth tells the amazing story of how Leonardo was compelled to paint the now-famous portrait of a Florentine housewife, in order to secure the contract to paint the biggest fresco ever attempted in Florence. That fresco, now lost, depicted the Battle of Anghiari in the Palazzo della Signoria, today called the Palazzo Vecchio. But surprisingly, it was the portrait of M(ad)onna Lisa that would establish his fame as a leading artist of the High Renaissance.